Lists within lists and finding things...

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kanen
Posts: 145
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:24 pm
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Lists within lists and finding things...

Post by kanen »

I'm trying to figure out if any of the items in a bigger list are in a smaller list. I've tried a bunch of options, but none of them are fast enough.

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(setf big-list '( ((5 0 0 0 3 14 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0) 1006) ((8 97 108 45 106 105 110 97 110 3 110 101 116 0 0 1 0 1) 1001) ((8 97 49 45 106 105 110 97 110 3 110 101 116 0 0 1 0 1) 1001) ((6 97 114 100 100 114 97 4 104 111 115 116 2 115 107 0 0 1 0 1) 1001) ((3 119 119 119 5 106 111 45 117 102 3 110 101 116 0 0 1 0 1) 1001) ((3 119 119 119 12 106 111 102 112 109 117 121 116 114 118 99 102 3 99 111 109 0 0 1 0 1) 1001) ((71 69 84 32) 1001) ((46 46 47 46 46 47 46 46 47) 232) ((205 128 232 215 255 255 255) 232) ((7 10 0 0 0 75 0 208 0) 286) ((7 0 0 0 0 75 0 208 0) 286) ((0 0 0 0 3 97 112 105 7) 1010) ))
;
(setf small-list '(59 126 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 97 112 105 7 116 119 105 116 116 101 114 3 99 111 109 0 0 1 0 1) )
Is there a REALLY FAST way to see if an item in the big-list is contained within the small-list and return the value associated with the big-list content? For example;

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> (last big-list)
((0 0 0 0 3 97 112 105 7) 1010)
I can now do something like:

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(intersect ((last big-list) 0) small-list)
; (0 3 97 112 105 7)
If the above was present in the small-list (which it is in this case), I'd want to return 1010, which is the "value" of that line in the big-list.

The only problem with this way of doing it is the "0" gets squashed into one value, so I don't get a "this is an exact match". Also, intersect seems to be slower than I'd like.

Thanks!
. Kanen Flowers http://kanen.me .

rickyboy
Posts: 599
Joined: Fri Apr 08, 2005 7:13 pm
Location: Front Royal, Virginia

Re: Lists within lists and finding things...

Post by rickyboy »

Kanen,

If you want to find an exact sublist in a longer list, then this might do:

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(define (sublist? SUBLIST SUPERLIST)
  "Check if SUBLIST occurs in SUPERLIST, for instance
   (sublist? '(1 2 3) '(0 1 2 3 4)) => true."
  (let (len-superlist (length SUPERLIST)
        len-sublist (length SUBLIST))
    (for (i 0 (- len-superlist len-sublist) 1
            (= SUBLIST (slice SUPERLIST i len-sublist)))
      nil)))

(define (second xs) (xs 1))
Then the following expression answers part of your question, namely "... see if an item in the big-list is contained within the small-list and return the value associated with the big-list content?" This will check all big-list items against small-list and return only the values.

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> (map second (filter (fn (b) (sublist? (b 0) small-list)) big-list))
(1010)
Looks like there is only one "record" in big-list that contains a sublist of small-list: the one associated to the value 1010.

sublist? is not as fast as intersect, but it's correct, whereas the intersect usage is not (if I understand what you are trying to do). Maybe you can make sublist? faster. Cheers!
(λx. x x) (λx. x x)

rickyboy
Posts: 599
Joined: Fri Apr 08, 2005 7:13 pm
Location: Front Royal, Virginia

Re: Lists within lists and finding things...

Post by rickyboy »

Hello Kanen,

When I wrote my last message, I had to guess (a little) as to what exactly you needed. Then today, I thought of another meaning regarding what you said.

When I coded sublist?, I assumed that you wanted to see if a big-list item (which was a list) was a sublist of small-list. Since order matters in lists, sublist? obeys the ordering of the elements of the lists involved. It also assumes that adjacent elements in the corresponding lists are preserved. For instance:

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> ;; Order matters
> (sublist? '(3 4) '(0 1 2 3 4))
true
> (sublist? '(4 3) '(0 1 2 3 4))
nil
> ;; Adjacency matters
> (sublist? '(3 4) '(0 1 2 3 3.5 4))
nil
But what if you had really meant for the "containment" to not necessarily respect element order or adjacency? Then, a natural way to do that would be to treat the lists as multisets. In this case, the test then changes from sublist? to subset? (where "set" in this context means multiset, a generalization of proper sets).

If that is what you were really after then please consider the following definitions.

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(define (subset? A B)
  "Is A a subset of B? (A and B are lists that act as multisets)."
  (if (empty? A) true
      (empty? B) nil
      (letn (sizeA0 (length A)        ; size of original A
             sizeB0 (length B)        ; size of original B
             dsize0 (- sizeB0 sizeA0) ; original delta of sizes
             sizeA sizeA0 sizeB sizeB0 dsize dsize0)
        (while (and (>= dsize 0) (= dsize0 dsize)
                    (not (empty? A)))
          (letn (elt (first A)
                 cnt (length (find-all elt A)))
            (setq A (remove cnt elt A))
            (setq B (remove cnt elt B))
            (setq sizeA (length A))
            (setq sizeB (length B))
            (setq dsize (- sizeB sizeA))))
        (empty? A))))
for which you will need the following definition.

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(define (remove HOW-MANY ELT LST)
  "Remove as many as HOW-MANY occurences of ELT in LST."
  (let (elt-position true)
    (while (and elt-position (> HOW-MANY 0))
      (when (setq elt-position (find ELT LST))
        (pop LST elt-position)
        (dec HOW-MANY)))
    LST))
Now, neither order nor adjacency matter.

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> ;; Order doesn't matter now.
> (subset? '(3 4) '(0 1 2 3 4))
true
> (subset? '(4 3) '(0 1 2 3 4))
true
> ;; Adjacency doesn't matter either.
> (subset? '(3 4) '(0 1 2 3 3.5 4))
true
It just so happens that, with the given definitions of big-list and small-list, using subset? as the test yields the same answer as using sublist? as the test.

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> (map second (filter (fn (b) (subset? (b 0) small-list)) big-list))
(1010)
And as before, the functions I defined might not meet your performance standards, so please bum the code as appropriate. :)
(λx. x x) (λx. x x)

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